Volume 3, Issue 3, March 2015

SALE: $199

1.
Paradoxical Perspectives on the Stages of Cognitive Development
Lori Smith
 

Abstract: From a critical point of view, this article presented Piaget’s four developmental stages and provided paradoxical perspectives on the procedures of cognitive development. One convincing perspectives presented focused on how the four stages such as 

sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational stages transit from one stage to another. Another 

perspective stated that the theory was not very convincing because it lacks a basis, which can join the theoretical basis (formal 

operational stage) and the practical experiment (concrete operational stage) into an organic unit...

2.
Principles for Becoming Enlightening Educators Within The Scope of Academic Practitioners 
Matthew Ruggier
 

Abstract: There is no standard stereotype for being an excellent teacher because every teacher is unique in his or her way of imparting knowledge to learners, of guiding learners to learn how to learn. Education aims at educating whole person and training the versatility and creativity of learners. Teaching is not a process of imparting certain part of knowledge rather the cultivation of developing 

strategies to solve problems effectively, to view the world with unique perspective and to construct one’s own knowledge of the world...

 
3.
Achieving Dialectical Balance under the Framework of Cognitive Process of Assimilation and Accommodation
Mark Jones
 

Abstract: Cognitive development consists of active assimilation, active accommodation and equilibration. The theory has 

extraordinarily surpassed traditional behaviorism and logical positivism and laid foundation for the constructivist perspectives of 

people’s active role in constructing their personal knowledge and developing their cognitive ability. The article tentatively analyzed 

the dynamic relationship between assimilation and accommodation and initiated how to achieve dialectical balance within the 

cognitive framework of cognitive development...

4.
How to Integrate Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment to Facilitate Special Education
Kathy Freeman 
 

Abstract: Feuerstein’s general teaching technique is called instrumental enrichment, which was frequently abbreviated to IE. The 

theory was based on an interactionist theory of learning between the teacher and the learners. The ideal setting under IE is defined as 

the following: the size of the class is ideally in single figures; IE involves a program of mental activities, with an emphasis on the 

nonverbal, such as patterns of shapes; In reality, however, it also includes language, numbers and pictures. There are fifteen separate 

sequenced sets of tasks; each one is claimed to develop a particular mental skill. In the classroom setting, there usually involves 

comparison, classification, sequencing and understanding relationships in space and time. When used in special education, Feuerstein 

tries to avoid content that is associated by special learners with previous failure...

5.
Comparative Debate On Vygotsky and the Vygotskyans
Tianhua Guan
 

Abstract: Vygotsky was one of the forerunner who critically responded to Piaget’s rudimental cognitive development perspective. He 

argues that a child’s intellectual development cannot be considered in a social vacuum. Cognitive development takes place as a result 

of mutual interaction between the child and those people with whom he has regular social contact. Vygotsky put his energies into 

analyzing the overall process of education rather than concentrating on empirical studies. Unlike Piaget, he did not himself manage to follow up the empirical implications of his own ideas. Instead he attempted to synthesize all the factors affecting the transmission of 

knowledge. Yet despite this very theoretical approach, his work has great influence on educational practitioners...

6.
What is Responsible Educator’s Role in Task-based Interaction
Jaquet Lyttle 
 

Abstract: Teaching is an activity that is embedded within a set of culturally bound assumptions about teachers, teaching and learners. 

These assumptions reflect what the teacher’s responsibility is believed to be, how learning is understood, and how students are expected to interact in the classroom. In some cultures, teaching is viewed as a teacher -controlled and directed process. However, task -based 

learning teaches the students the technique of autonomous learning. In the activities, the teacher should promote the students’ 

communication procedure; in the meanwhile, the teacher is not only the participant in the classroom interaction, but also the 

omniscient mediator. Teachers also have many other roles in task -based interaction as the following: Planner, Manager, Quality controller, Group organizer, Facilitator, Motivator, Empower, Team member and Co-operator...

 

 

Journal of American Academic Research 

© 2019  Copyright by Journal of American Academic Research. All rights reserved.

  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • Yelp Social Icon